(c) Copyright 2012 College of Menominee Nation

DPI Documents

College of Menominee Nation
Assessment System

Assessment is a valued part of a student’s educational experience. The College of Menominee Nation has institutionalized several forms of standardized assessments through the use of Accuplacer, Test of Adult Based Education (TABE), Collegiate Assessment of Academic Proficiency (CAAP), course exams, and the development and assessment of the student portfolio. The student portfolio is introduced in EDU 100 Student Success and completed in EDU 295 Student Portfolio. Students are assessed at registration-- Accuplacer and TABE-- in reading, language arts, and mathematics as well as in college preparatory classes, midterm and final exams in all course work, CAAP in EDU 295. In addition, the College requires a student portfolio documenting accomplishment of the general education objectives and the program outcomes of emphasis courses. The teacher education program requires passing grades on the Pre-Professional Skills Test (PPST), an entrance portfolio, a Wisconsin Ten Standards for Teacher Preparation and Licensure portfolio, passing grades on Praxis II, satisfactory evaluations of field experience and a student teaching portfolio.

Assessment at the time of enrollment at the College of Menominee Nation consist of evaluation of any prior transcripts from high school or other institutions of higher learning, administration of the Accuplacer to determine placement in reading, English, math, and an interview by the advisor. College of Menominee Nation Students must complete the following general education requirements (53-58 credits):

•9 credits in humanities (HIS 112, 121 or LAN 101),

•8-10 credits in natural sciences (Bio 110 & 111 and another course & lab),

•6-9 credits in mathematics (MAT 106, MAT 120 or 260),

•9 credits in social sciences (HUD 210, EDU 236 + elective),

•3 credits in fine arts,

•3 credits in sustainable development,

•3 in credits oral communications (COM 100),

•3 credits general education requirements (EDU 100, EDU 295),

•6 credits in English (ENG 101, ENG 102).

For an Early Childhood/Elementary Education emphasis-- Associate of Arts and Sciences Degree-- students take 15 credits (EDU 250, EDU 256, EDU 237, EDU 238) emphasizing child growth development, lesson planning, assessment of young children and differentiation of instruction and assessment (PI 34.15,(7)).

Freshman and sophomores also complete 40 hours of supervised field experience which assess human relations, professional dispositions and beginning teaching practices, such as preparation of instruction, student assessment and communication skills. During this time, students also take the Pre-Professional Skills Tests (PPST) to achieve passing grades (reading175/writing174/mathematics173).

The final course in the associate program, EDU 295 Student Portfolio, assists students in collecting artifacts and reflecting/evaluating their work according to general education objectives and emphasis course program outcomes. Communication skills, professional dispositions, and content knowledge are assessed in this portfolio (PI 34.15, (2)). Students present their portfolios and accomplishment of the mission of the College of Menominee Nation in a public forum. Upon completion of the general education requirements and the early childhood core courses, a student may apply for admission into the teacher education program. Requirements for admission include a portfolio containing:

•a current resume;

•a B or better in oral communications;

•an essay on the philosophy of teaching;

•artifacts from HUD 210 Introduction to Human Development, EDU 237 Observation and Interpretation of Child Behavior, and EDU 250 Introduction to Teacher Education;

•three letters of reference;

•CMN transcript and transcripts from other institutions of higher learning indicating a GPA of 2.75 or above;

•documented field experience for EDU 201 Emergent Literacy, EDU 237 Observation and Interpretation, and EDU 250

Introduction to Teacher Education

Students schedule an interview with the admissions committee. Prior to the interview, students are required to submit an admissions portfolio which contains artifacts (prepared according to NAEYC Standards) from the following classes: HUD 210, EDU 237, and EDU 250. The admissions committee interviews and recommends students based upon College of Menominee Nation Teacher Education dispositions (caring, reflective, respectful, risk-taking, collaborative); personal and professional qualities referenced in the essay and letters of recommendation; academic requirements: portfolio, GPA, and transcript. Following CMN background check and TB test, a notice of acceptance, conditional acceptance or non-acceptance, is sent to the student and a student file is created. Students are then instructed to meet with a program advisor to determine course work for the semester.

CMN Teacher Education Program has a Policy for Admission Exceptions for Non-Admittance. Addressing failed PPST scores, the student:

•Submits a typed letter to teacher education committee stating the reasons for seeking an exception listing the PPST scores, dates, and content of tutoring and multiple attempts to pass the test;

•Presents two letters of recommendation from two instructors and a tutor attesting to the candidate’s competence in the area of deficiency-- reading, writing, or math;

•Meets with advisor to develop an Improvement Plan to address a GPA of less than 2.75.

The Teacher Education Committee reviews requests for exceptions to the admission requirements of grade point average or non passing scores in a section of the PPST and makes a decision to approve or deny the requests. Only 10 % of admissions may be exempted. Students are informed of the decision in writing (PI 34.14.1 (b)).

Once admitted into the teacher education program, students are assessed on content, human relations, professional dispositions, pedagogical knowledge, and teaching practice (PI34.15 (2)) informally and formally with midterm and final examinations and field experiences.

Methods courses review essential content information, teaching strategies and assessment methods. All Methods classes include field experiences in local elementary schools that are assessed on communication skills, professional dispositions, content knowledge, pedagogical knowledge, and teaching practice (PI 34.15, (2)).

Practicum Courses

EDU 311 Pre-student Teaching Practicum 1 (co-requisite courses are EDU 307 Methods for Teaching Reading, and EDU 308 Methods for Language Arts), EDU 312 Practicum II (co-requisite courses are EDU 306 Methods for Teaching Mathematics, EDU 309 Methods for Teaching Science), EDU 401 Student Teaching, and EDU 402 Student Teaching Seminar. These courses assess field experiences and assist students in creating the InTasc Standards Portfolio.

When Methods courses are completed, Praxis II has been passed, and the students have created a portfolio based on the Wisconsin Ten Standards for Preparation and Licensure of Teachers, they may apply for student teaching. In addition to the standards portfolio, the students again submit to a background check, submit two letters of recommendation, Praxis II scores, a current resume, and evaluations of cooperating teachers from method courses with field experiences.

Specific Assessment

EDU 401 and EDU 402 Student Teaching and Student Teaching Seminar assess the entire student file and subsequent portfolios to determine if a student has met all the requirements for knowledge, skills, and dispositions required for a practicing teacher to become a professional educator (PI34.14, 2, (b)).

Students indicate the InTASC (Interstate teacher Assessment and Support Consortium) Standards on each of the lesson plans they create for EDU 238 Play and Creative Activities and the 300 level methods courses (EDU 304, EDU 305, EDU 306, EDU 307, EDU 308, EDU 309, EDU 310) and in student teaching (EDU 401 and EDU 402) (PI 34.15 2,(b)).

CMN teacher education program students demonstrate knowledge and understanding of minority group relations listed in PI 34.15, 4 (b-d).

1. The history, culture, tribal sovereignty of American Indian Tribes and bands in Wisconsin. Thesis topics are covered in the following courses:

HIS 121 Survey of American Indian History-- contact, assimilation, acculturation, adaptation, and sovereignty concepts;

EDU 305 Methods for Social Studies-- Wisconsin Tribes;

EDU 300 Foundations of American Education-- contributions of women, racial groups, culture;

EDU 301 Educational Technology-- software review critiques portrayal of differentiated groups, modify software for usefulness to particular students especially American Indian students; use of cultural language vocabulary and phrases;

EDU 306 Methods for Teaching Mathematics-- Cognitively Guided Instruction (CGI) for social environment conducive to all student’s thinking and cultural backgrounds, examination of teacher beliefs, use of cultural language vocabulary and phrases;

EDU 309 Methods for Teaching Science-- Environmental Responsible Unit Plan (authentic culturally responsive); use of cultural language vocabulary/phrases;

EDU 310 Methods for Health and Physical Education-- American Indian games and access to health resources; use of cultural language vocabulary and phrases.

2. Contributions of women and racial, cultural, language and economic groups in the United States. These topic areas are found in:

EDU 300 Foundations of American Education-- contributions of women, persons representing different races and culture (parallel American Indian Education, Economic groups);

EDU 305 Methods for Social Studies-- Wisconsin tribes, women, racial/economic groups;

EDU 315 Cultural Images in Children’s Literature: cultures, women authors, economic groups;

LAN 110 Tribal Languages and Culture;

EDU 301 Educational Technology-- software review to analyze contributions of individuals (those who represent particular groups by SES/gender/tribe/cultural group/sexual preference);

EDU 304 Methods for Art and Music-- Drumming and Flute Playing and Ancient (petroglyphs) to Modern American Indian Art;

EDU 306 Methods for Teaching Mathematics-- Ethnomathematics (American Indians, indigenous groups); women in

mathematics, Cognitively Guided Instruction (women challenged);

EDU 309 Methods for Teaching Science-- Environmental Philosophy of American Indians and authentic sustainability concept;

EDU 310 Methods for Health and Physical Education-- American Indian games.

3. Philosophical and psychological bases of attitude development and change. The following courses address these issues:

HUD 256 Social and Family Influences on Early Development and Learning;

HUD 210 Introduction to Human Development-- brain development;

EDU 211 Introduction to Children with Exceptionalities-- theory, practical strategies for effective communication, collaboration skills;

EDU 315 Cultural Images in Children’s Literature—stereotypes, bias, authenticity of multicultural literature;

EDU 302 Educational Psychology-- personal, social, moral development, and diversity;

EDU 301 Educational Technology-- survey of attitudes regarding a safe social computer environment free from harassment and exclusion in actual classroom observations;

EDU 306 Methods for Teaching Mathematics-- constructivist problem solving environment that foster positive attitudes towards asking, receiving, offering help that measures independence in each student’s solution strategies (via survey that scales expectations/independence in problem solving);

EDU 307 Methods for Teaching Reading-- attitude toward reading/literacy;

EDU 308-Methods for Language Arts-- developing voice as a speaker and writer;

EDU 309 Methods for Teaching Science-- teacher candidates facilitating discrepant events; developing attitudes regarding usefulness of science for particular groups;

EDU 310 Methods for Health and Physical Education-- attitudes change behaviors regarding personal health habits; changing attitudes regarding competition, developmentally/individually appropriate activities.

4. Conflict resolution is studied in:

EDU 256 Social and Family Influences-- issues of bullying

EDU 314 Classroom Behavior and Management-- Conflict resolution between pupils and/or pupils and staff, assisting students in resolving conflicts, peer mediation, and dealing with crisis in classroom;

EDU 302 Educational Psychology-- introduction to the issues of conflict management;

EDU 301 Educational Technology-- survey of attitudes regarding a safe social computer environment free from harassment and exclusion in actual classroom observations;

EDU 306 Methods for Teaching Mathematics-- constructivist problem solving environment that focuses on reasoning and learning from each other;

EDU 310 Methods for Health and Physical Education-- creating fun, enjoyable, and challenging activities for all in emotionally friendly and physically safe environments free from bullying.

5. Program students will meet the environmental education requirement in the following environmental education and a science methods courses:

•ENV 150 Introduction to Environmental Sciences-- environmental concerns, social implications of interaction of people and environment, sociological implications and strategies for sustainable development;

•SDE 100 Introduction to Sustainable Development-- Menominee ethic of sustainability, social and ethical responsibility of global citizenship, introduction to sustainability across the curriculum;

•EDU 309 Methods for Teaching Science-- Environmental philosophy of American Indians and authentic sustainability concept, environmental unit.

6. CMN program students meet the reading and language arts requirement through current best practices. These reading strategies are introduced, practiced, and assessed in:

•EDU 201 Emergent Literacy—phonetic awareness, oral language and vocabulary development, assessment, comprehension, and motivation;

•EDU 307 Methods for Teaching Reading--Using appropriate reading and language arts instructional strategies for a balanced literary approach including phonics;

•EDU 308 Methods for Language Arts-- coordinates with the strategies of EDU 307 Methods for Reading.

In summary, College of Menominee Nation has established an assessment system from student admission to completion of degree for candidates. This assessment system is aligned to the conceptual framework based on the five major clans of the Menominee Nation, current educational research, and the Wisconsin Standards for Teacher Preparation and Licensure. The evaluation of candidates is developmental, multiple, and ongoing with several levels of advancement. These levels are as follows: admission to the college, admission to teacher education, admission to student teaching and graduation or readiness for licensure as a professional teacher.